Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements. 

An appropriate candidate is a generally healthy individual, while particular health problems, including diabetes, obesity, bleeding disorders, heart or breathing diseases, could increase the complication risk. Any pre-existing conditions should be extensively discussed with the surgeon to achieve the most satisfying results and prevent life-threatening outcomes.

During your search for a surgeon, keep in mind that “as with any cosmetic procedure, the price should not be the primary factor in choosing your surgeon,” Orlando, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Armando Soto, says in a RealSelf Q&A. “This is not to say that less expensive surgeons are uniformly going to deliver poor care, just that the costs should be secondary to your overall sense of comfort and confidence in the surgeon you choose.”
Finally, there’s the so-called scarless lift. Women who are seeking a mild lift but are dead set against leaving scars anywhere on their breasts may opt for a technique that uses a network of dissolving surgical threads inserted through tiny incisions along the collar bone, guided under the breast tissue, and then anchored to the collar bone, to create an internal bra of sorts. Scar tissue forms around the threads, theoretically providing support to lift the nipple. 
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